Melissa Farley FOR the motion that “It’s Wrong To Pay For Sex” , - Intelligence Squared Debates

critically important.  she is not making the sex-negative argument that sex work is motivated by false consciousness.  Rather, she even admits that sex work can be positive for a very small minority, but on the whole it is exploitative.  Excellent argumentation, and the proper way to be both feminist and anti-sex work.  

(Source: gynocraticgrrl, via sarahtude)

On a capitalism reading list

dearcoquette:

"We are surrounded by capitalist tools. The trick is not using them for their intended purpose." Would you make a reading list based on this, please?


Sure. Here’s a trio of easily accessible books that will give you a broad but critical overview of the current state of American capitalism:

Anonymous asked: I'm having trouble understanding how discrimination is different then racism. I can see how not all discrimination is racist but isn't all racism discrimination?

catbattles:

thedarkchocolatedandy:

Think of it in terms of levels or grades

racism > discrimination > prejudice

and understand that there are different types of racism, you have interpersonal racism, institutional racism, and systemic racism. 

but for the sake of this conversation, let’s keep it simple. 

Prejudice is when a person holds illogical negative views about a particular subject. This subject could literally be anything. 

Discrimination is when a person let’s their personal prejudices manifest by actively acting in detriment towards whatever they’re prejudice against. 

Racism is a system of societal wide discrimination created by those who hold society power and privilege. 

Bite sized education. Yum.

killsmedead:

lizznotliz:

gigidowns | courtenaybird:


The Get More Out of Google Infographic Summarizes Online Research Tricks for Students

I consistently forget these tricks. Now I have a visual. Thanks, Internet.


I wish I’d known this in undergrad.

Sending this to my coworkers on Monday.

killsmedead:

lizznotliz:

gigidowns | courtenaybird:

The Get More Out of Google Infographic Summarizes Online Research Tricks for Students

I consistently forget these tricks. Now I have a visual. Thanks, Internet.

image

I wish I’d known this in undergrad.

Sending this to my coworkers on Monday.

(via 1-4victor-out)

"Another myth that is firmly upheld is that disabled people are dependent and non-disabled people are independent. No one is actually independent. This is a myth perpetuated by disablism and driven by capitalism - we are all actually interdependent. Chances are, disabled or not, you don’t grow all of your food. Chances are, you didn’t build the car, bike, wheelchair, subway, shoes, or bus that transports you. Chances are you didn’t construct your home. Chances are you didn’t sew your clothing (or make the fabric and thread used to sew it). The difference between the needs that many disabled people have and the needs of people who are not labelled as disabled is that non-disabled people have had their dependencies normalized. The world has been built to accommodate certain needs and call the people who need those things independent, while other needs are considered exceptional. Each of us relies on others every day. We all rely on one another for support, resources, and to meet our needs. We are all interdependent. This interdependence is not weakness; rather, it is a part of our humanity."

AJ Withers Disability Politics and Theory p109 (via dandyfied)

(via lndisher)

"

The cultural part happens when you mix those accidents of prehistoric geography with the movement of people through that same geography. The footprint of the fall line is roughly the same as the South’s so-called “black belt,” where upwards of 1 million enslaved Africans were brought to work on the area’s plantations. Many of those slaves came from West Africa, another place where geophagy was historically a part of the culture, again particularly among pregnant women.

Sadly — but not at all unexpectedly — kaolin became yet another manifestation of the South’s division and inequality among the races. White kaolin barons paid pittances for the mineral rights to land owned by countless African-American farm families along the fall line. Those same white people, when they encountered African-Americans who kept kaolin in their diets, didn’t see the continuation of a centuries-old cultural tradition. They just saw one more reason to believe their black neighbors were inferior.

"

Eat White Dirt (via peachtreekeen)

"Lacanian ethics is not an ethics of hedonism: whatever “do not compromise your desire” means, it does not mean the unrestrained rule of what Freud called “the pleasure principle,” the functioning of the psychic apparatus that aims at achieving pleasure. For Lacan, hedonism is in fact the model of postponing desire on behalf of “realistic compromises”: it is not only that, in order to attain the greatest amount of pleasure, I have to calculate and economize, sacrificing short‐term pleasures for more intense long‐term ones; what is even more important is that jouissance hurts. So, first, there is no break between the pleasure principle and its counterpart, the “reality principle”: the latter (compelling us to take into account the limitations that thwart our direct access to pleasure) is an inherent prolongation of the former."

Slavoj Zizek, Less Than Nothing

The security state and a theory of destituent power

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

Today in history: February 20, 1990 – The bitterly fought, militant 10-month Pittston coal strike ends in a victory against concessions for the workers. 
The strike was led by the United Mine Workers Union (UMWA) against the Pittston Coal Company. It started April 5, 1989 and was provoked by Pittston’s termination of health care for 1,500 retirees, widows, and disabled miners, and their refusal to contribute to the benefit trust for miners who retired before 1974. They also started running the mines 24-7 with no overtime for the workers. The strike affected production in mines in Virginia, WV and KY. 
Mine workers and their families engaged in work stoppage, occupations, civil disobedience, protests and direct confrontation, flaunting numerous legal injunctions and costly fines. At its peak in June 1989, the strike involved approximately 2,000 miners daily staying at Camp Solidarity with thousands more sending donations and holding wildcat walkouts that involved around 40,000 people. The participation of women through the formation of the Daughters of Mother Jones was an essential element of the successful strike. 
The strike was a victory against concessions: miners again received their benefits. Pittston had to pay $10 million toward the health care of the miners who had retired before 1974. The mines could stay open with extended shifts, but the amount miners had to work was limited by the agreement. The UMWA got the legal fines against them dropped, which had included $13,000 a day against individual union officials and a total of $64 million against the union. 
(image: marshalls attempt to arrest striking miners and their supporters)
Via Freedom Road Socialist Organization (Fight Back!)

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

Today in history: February 20, 1990 – The bitterly fought, militant 10-month Pittston coal strike ends in a victory against concessions for the workers.

The strike was led by the United Mine Workers Union (UMWA) against the Pittston Coal Company. It started April 5, 1989 and was provoked by Pittston’s termination of health care for 1,500 retirees, widows, and disabled miners, and their refusal to contribute to the benefit trust for miners who retired before 1974. They also started running the mines 24-7 with no overtime for the workers. The strike affected production in mines in Virginia, WV and KY.

Mine workers and their families engaged in work stoppage, occupations, civil disobedience, protests and direct confrontation, flaunting numerous legal injunctions and costly fines. At its peak in June 1989, the strike involved approximately 2,000 miners daily staying at Camp Solidarity with thousands more sending donations and holding wildcat walkouts that involved around 40,000 people. The participation of women through the formation of the Daughters of Mother Jones was an essential element of the successful strike.

The strike was a victory against concessions: miners again received their benefits. Pittston had to pay $10 million toward the health care of the miners who had retired before 1974. The mines could stay open with extended shifts, but the amount miners had to work was limited by the agreement. The UMWA got the legal fines against them dropped, which had included $13,000 a day against individual union officials and a total of $64 million against the union.

(image: marshalls attempt to arrest striking miners and their supporters)

Via Freedom Road Socialist Organization (Fight Back!)

(via plaidika)

thalensis:

Ableism is disabled workers being legally paid less than minimum wage - even as little as 22 cents per hour - because we are considered “less productive” than abled workers.

real talk

(via ekaterinadaniels)